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  #31  
Unread 11-19-2010, 12:24 PM
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Default Re: Paul Magyar's 1995 Subaru Impreza L - Street Mod/Track build

Update for Nov 9, 2010: Went by Paul's on the night of Nov 9, supposedly to install his engine. Calvin from COBB was there, local SMod racer Henry L was there. Problem was, all of the parts we needed to put on the motor weren't there...



They messed around on the motor for a bit, installed a few bits, but the threaded (blind) hole for the knock sensor was stripped when the sensor was being torqued, so that put the brakes on further work (time for a helicoil repair). And the turbo + up-pipe weren't back from SWAIN getting coated yet, so the motor install was pushed back another week or three. I messed around on the rear suspension for a while all night.

While they were tinkering on the "its taking freagin forever engine", I was checking tire clearance on the fender work already performed out back. Eventually I removed the spring on the left rear strut and compressed the suspension with the tire installed, checking to see if the tire hit the body before the strut bottomed out into the bump stop. Yep, still needs a lot more tire clearance upward. The offending metal is actually the metal inner-fender structure out by the edge of the fender - it curves downward. Luckily SMod rules allow for this to be cut out and modified, so long as it falls in the range "outside of the axle mounting face". We took a straight edge and scribed a line from the rotor face upward and around the wheel well. Then I started cutting away more metal from there out, which got us more bump travel room.



We still need to cut more of the outer fender panel sheet metal away, but keep it within the outline we made with the new metal flares we mocked up last time. The fender flare is just for looks; it will simply "cover up the ugly hole" we make trying to clear the wide tire under bump travel.

So now its time for me to bring my welder over and get to patching up the giant holes left from Paul's previous "flaring" attempt, spot weld the new metal flare on, then do more "compress the suspension/tire" testing.



Not much to show here, sorry. Other than mauling a few pizzas and cutting a little bit on the rear fender, the night was pretty much a wash. Since then many more parts have arrived and Paul has even installed a few things. There's a window (when Calvin returns to COBB after an upcoming vacation) that Paul is trying to hit (he's taking the car to them with the motor installed, so they can tune it), so he has his deadline and that motor has to go in. Go go go!



I'll probably go by there this weekend with the welder and see if we can get the fender flares tacked up on the rear, so he can at least roll the car with the car no longer being Hellaflush.


Hellaflush Subaru!

More soon,

Last edited by Fair!; 12-16-2010 at 11:22 AM.
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Unread 12-13-2010, 07:38 PM
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Default Re: Paul Magyar's 1995 Subaru Impreza L - Street Mod/Track build

Update for Nov 27-28, 2010: You can see in the update above that we had already started work on clearancing the fenders on Paul's GC for the wider 275mm tires (and hopefully 285s). Well on the weekend of Nov 27-28 I made a house call and Paul & I tackled the rear fender flare cutting/clearancing/welding, and it came out nice and tidy. Whenever we do flares like this I get a million questions, so we took tons of iPhone4 pics & videos, real pics with the Nikon D90, and better HD video with my Sony vidcam. I'm still splicing video together so that will come in the next installment.

Picture gallery: http://vorshlag.smugmug.com/Projects...fender-flares/

We've got the step-by-step for the rear chronicled in the gallery above, and when we tackle the fronts (3 times easier!) we'll add those pics there as well, plus videos. The rear of any unibody car is always is much more work than the front when adding real flares for substantially wider and/or taller tires. This is because the front fenders are mostly cosmetic and contribute very little to chassis strength - just a thin, formed steel sheet covering the tire. The pretty part. The rear fenders, however, are tied into the rear unibody structure, with as many as 3 layers of steel (common) that all come together at the outer fender lip joint. When you go cutting up that fender arch for more tire clearance, all of that metal gets mangled... and the structure goes to hell. You can't leave these 3 sheets flapping in he breeze. Most of our work was putting all of those pieces together again, properly, with adequate clearance for this much lowered car, with shorter struts, and much wider/taller tires. We probably removed and moved the upper fender arch upwards over 4 inches. Covering the tire with the cosmetic flare (in this case: steel) was the final part... and the easiest step. If you think its easier to do composite flares, think again - the basic clearancing and unibody reinforcement work is the same. Pimpin' ain't easy, but for many racers, this work is necessary.


Left: Paul's attempt #1. Right: Paul's Attempt #2. Both failed.

Before I got involved Paul tried to use my fender roller to make enough clearance in the left rear fender lip for the wider wheels (above, left), but that didn't work. Next (above, right) he cut away the outer sheet from the 3-piece sheet structure at the rear lip and started hammer forming the lip contour heavily. His second effort actually looked pretty good at ride height (he burned several hours learning/making this fender section) but like many flaring efforts, it had no clearance under suspension bump travel (wheel going upwards after hitting a bump). This might cut it in hard parking/VIP/car show crowd, but this doesn't work at all on a real street or race car.


Left: BMW fender flare "graft" mocked up on front. Right: And on the rear.

That's when I came in and suggested we add real fender flares. Again. Paul and I had discussed this back in 2009 but he was hesitant, mostly because he knew how much time and effort (30-40 hours) in fabrication and bodywork was involved on the 4-5 other flare jobs I've done on BMWs (several of which Paul helped with). He didn't want the delay. But we got to a point to where we couldn't move the car around - the stock wheels were the wrong bolt pattern and the new 114.3mm PCD wheels he had wouldn't clear the fenders at ride height. And the next step after the motor goes in is a trip to COBB, and they need to drive it... so after we mocked up some pre-cut BMW fender section templates I had on hand for BMW use, and they looked like they'd fit, we started cutting for clearance. This was the real work.



Since I wired up Paul's garage I made sure it used the same 220V outlets as my shop and welders, so when I brought my Miller 175 MIG set-up over, it plugged in and worked fine. I normally don't do house calls like this (if I haven't offered, don't ask!), but Paul is one of my oldest and best friends from college, so he gets special treatment. And I've sort of adopted/got stuck with much of this Subaru GC swap project. I also supplied a pair of the donor BMW E46 coupe front fenders, since I had a couple of spares from my DSP E46 project that were already partially hacked up, but not anywhere near the flare sections. Paul still has to round up 2 more fenders for the front (these are around $35 each from Certifit; no, you can't order them online).


Cutting and clearancing for full bump travel - the correct way

This next step is the most critical for flaring any car - and the one most people get wrong. With the spring removed from the rear suspension and a jack under the control arm we kept compressing the strut until it hit the bump stop (and compressed it as well), with the 275mm tire on the 18x9.5" test wheel. We kept cutting the outer fender sheet metal and modifying the inner structure, step by step, until we ran out of suspension travel. Lots of iterations.

Since this is a car built to the SCCA's Street Modified (SMod) class rules, we knew we were allowed to cut away the inner structure only from the "axle face outwards". So we drew a line around at the plane at the axle face onto the inner structure sheet metal and "pie cut" from there outward that to the fender lip face, then hammered these sections up for more bump travel clearance. Everything inboard from there has to remain stock, but luckily that wasn't an issue, as the inner fender structure arced downward fairly sharply from this plane down to the fender lip. This step took many iterations and burned about 3 hours of cut-install wheel-compress-mark-remove-cut-repeat for the left rear fender.



On the right rear fender this clearance work went a lot faster... we drew a "grid" on the rear fenders and transferred the "arc of clearance" from the first fender (left) to the second (right). This way we didn't have the 2-3 hour "hunt and peck" iterations to find the optimal full bump travel tire clearance; it took only about 20-25 minutes to measure, mark and cut that fender. We copied the mirror image fender flare donor section from the BMW fenders as best we could, also. The donor fenders are cross opposites of where they end up.. the left front BMW fender flare went on the right rear of the Subaru, and vice verca.



The now cut apart inner and outer fender structures were super weak and floppy, so we had to tie the rear structure back together. Since Paul had started cutting on the left rear fender area earlier ("without adult supervision"), he had mistakenly cut away some portions of the inner sheet metal (see above, left), so I had to make and weld on small patch panels around the entire perimeter of the LR wheel arch to tie the remaining inner structure back to the outer fender. These were pieces of lightweight 20 ga sheet, cut in small sections (transferred from cardboard templates), welded along one edge, and hammer former around the arch, then finish welded (this makes a lot more sense when you see the video). The right rear fender was, again, much easier (since Paul hadn't touched it yet!). We knew where we had to end up with vertically, so once that was marked and the outer sheet metal cut, we left most of the inner structure in place. Then just pie-sectioned the inner structure instead of removing it, and I only had to weld in small patch panels for about 1/2 the perimeter of the opening.



Of course the inner sheet metal must be cleaned to remove undercoating and paint, to allow the patch panels to weld on, as well as the outer fender sections (for both the patch panels and the flare sections; and clean off the edge of the donor flare sections, too). This is dirty, nasty work which we did with 3 tools: the MBX crud buster, a 90 die grinder and a 3" (medium) ScotchBrite pad, and a 4" angle grinder with a 40 grit flapper disc. The electric angle grinder worked best but you have to watch out for heat or you'll warp the sheet metal and make for more bodywork later. We must have removed 12 pounds of mud from the car during all of this work - it was frakkin everywhere. And when welding in these patch panels you have to have the rear interior completely removed, of course. The undercoating you can't get to still catches fire constantly as you weld. Paul worked "fire marshal duty" with a small squirt bottle of water, and we had a real fire extinguisher handy.



Once the inner and outer sheet metal was tied back together with these 20 gauge sheet metal patches (stitch welded with a MIG, at ~1/4" intervals, with .024" wire, on low amperage) we could start on the actual flares. We cut up a donor pair of fenders (you want to use '99-01 BMW 328 sedan front fenders; we used coupe fenders which have a longer trim indention we had to fix via hammer/dolly work) and test fit them until the front of the car's fender arch lined up with the new flare section as close as possible. Yes, the '95 Impreza is made for a much smaller diameter tire, but since we were going to much taller 275/35/18s we had to "open up the arch", and the BMW fender sections worked great. We'll match the rear of the bumper cover opening with a few quick trims with the air saw, later (that ABS plastic cuts like butter so go slowly).



Welding on the fender flares themselves was the easy part. By far the hardest parts are the wheel/spacer testing, clearancing for bump travel, measuring, templates, inner fender structure/patch panels, and the metal prep. I spent maybe 15 minutes welding on each fender flare section. Slow, steady, skip welding about 1" apart, starting at the front of the fender opening. Paul held a pointed tip of a hammer on the section of the flare behind where I was welding, which puts the flare and the outer sheet metal in contact. We just slowly worked our way around, making sure to spread the heat and stopping to check the metal. We had very few fires to tend to during this step. The right rear had the added bonus of clearance around the fuel door; I cut around the door (using cardboard template I made with a "hand rubbing" of the fuel door opening, transferred to the flare, then cut out - before it was welded to the car) and I'll finish that up with a small patch panel at a later date.

So that's the basics of the flare job, and it was a solid 3 days of work. We both had a number of hours into the rear testing/cutting/Paul's rolling & hammer iterations, then spent two 6-8 hour weekend days doing the final testing, cutting, patch panels and welding on the rear flares. The rear is essentially done, save for the small fuel door patch panel, some more weatherproofing (to keep water/fumes out of the passenger compartment), and of course bodywork. It doesn't need any more welding on the flare sections, but I might add 100% more than there is now. Doesn't have to be a perfect linear welded seam - which is a LOT more work. We also tested with an 18x10" Enkei RPF-1 wheel. We'll mount a 285/30/18 Hoosier onto that wheel and verify that the flares clear those also, soon (should easily fit). That's the wheel & tire package Paul will likely use for NASA TTS class Time Trial use; he gets a solid 200 pound weight break for using the smaller 275/35/18s in SCCA SMod.

All of this work makes a lot more sense when you see it on video. We took vids of each step and will splice & edit that and upload it soon. Look for that in the next post. Please wait to ask questions until after I post the vids (soon). Have been on vacation (Playa del Carmen + Chichen Itza) and I am playing catch-up here at Vorshlag on drawings/work, plus I have a couple of other project threads to update first. Patience...



Paul's turbo and up pipe are both back from getting ceramic coated at Swain Tech, so hopefully the motor goes in this week. Then we can at least cut the front fenders over the next 2 weeks, for the upcoming COBB tuning and test drive. We'll tackle adding the front fender flares at the Vorshlag shop after its running (that's relatively easy; takes 1/3rd the work of the rears).

Cheers,

Last edited by Fair!; 07-23-2012 at 07:58 PM.
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Unread 02-15-2011, 08:39 PM
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Default Re: Paul Magyar's 1995 Subaru Impreza L - Street Mod/Track build

Project Update for Feb 15, 2011: I had a busy weekend, working on Paul's Subaru project on Saturday and McCall's Z3M LS1 project on Sunday, but we got a lot accomplished on both cars. Here's what was accomplished on Paul's Impreza... most notably the engine is in!



My wife and I met Paul for breakfast Saturday morning while he had new tires put on his Tahoe at Discount Tire. While we were there we mounted up one of my 285/30/18 Hoosier A6 tires onto his Enkei 18x10 mentioned earlier. We went back to his place and I slapped it on the rear of the Subaru (see above). Fits great, no spacer - and that's with no camber in the rear (it needs some). With a little fender rolling it will have tons of room at full bump travel. The floor was such a mess I didn't feel like pulling a spring to check that. The whole garage was a complete mess. The car still needs tie rods installed, and the front fenders cut, before we can even hope to get it on up front.

I quickly realized one thing - Paul hasn't set foot inside his garage since we last worked on the car together late last November. Every tool we left out after that weekend long "fender flare thrash" was still on the floor, as well as all of the dirt, weld spatter, tons of used parts he needs to sell, and hoards of new empty boxes. Oiy...


Left: One of many sets of used parts we put in the attic. Right: After hours of cleaning, we had room to work

So we spent the next 5+ hours cleaning out his garage and sorting usable and sellable parts from useless junk. I took pictures of all of the parts he needs to sell (which I'll post up in a detailed "for sale post" later, and handle the sale of all of this stuff - mostly stock and aftermarket Subaru bits) while we put them away in his attic. Cut up dozens of boxes, swept out the entire garage, moved the car so we could have room in the front to install the motor, installed his wall clock and some street signs he's had for years, and on and on. Paul removed the VIN plate from the old dash, we pulled the Sparco race steering wheel from a busted steering column, stuff like that. It went from a pig sty to a squeaky clean 3-car garage with tons of room around the car once again. Ah, now we can get some stuff done!

We finally started the real car work in the afternoon. Paul worked for a while installing header wrap on the crossover and up-pipe exhaust sections and installed the turbo, blow-off valve, and some turbo oil lines. He also mocked-up the (beautiful) COBB downpipe he picked up to fit the GC, mostly to make sure we had everything installed the right way. This all gets installed for good once the motor is in the car.



With Paul on the motor I installed the new Certifit OEM replacement right front fender, replacing a mangled and ugly green original fender. Then I swapped out the Vorshlag GD main camber plate portions (always meant to be temporary) for a pair of the all new "high caster" Vorshlag GC camber plates. This set-up orients the camber slots in the right direction, and the new HC design adds a good bit more positive caster up top to supplement the added caster at the bushings below. Looks great, very strong, and the caster is maximized perfectly; there's about .025" of room from the inboard camber adjustment bolt to the strut tower ring, so its got all the caster it can get up top. Plenty of max negative camber and total camber adjustment range, too.



Once I wrapped up those two little projects I helped Paul finally get this lump off the engine stand. Installed the pretty Fidanza aluminum flywheel and aftermarket pressure plate (both balanced to the new motor/crank), but he chose to use an old STi clutch disc. Some weird logic about an organic disc having more consistent (Pro Solo) launches with more clamping force from the pp. I dunno, it sounds kooky to put in a used disc into an all new set-up like this, to me. What do I know - I am not really a die-hard a Subaru guy. I don't have the Scooby hat, for one.



Once we got the flywheel torqued and the disc and pressure plate installed (hey Paul - buy a factory shop manual so we don't have to wade through internet forums looking for the proper torque settings, please) and the clutch alignment tool lined up, we hauled the chained up motor over tot he car for the motor installation. The trans was already in the car connected to the drivetrain, but the front crossmember was filthy, so I cleaned that to "shining". Still the car had no connected e-brake, no shifter installed, and no clutch hydraulics. Hmm, I'd sure like to have a way to put it into/out of gear, to hold the drive wheels via the e-brake, and a way to engage/disengage the clutch. I've stabbed many a trans and all of those things being hooked up always help... but what do I know - I'm not a Subaru guy.



Well Paul had never stabbed a Subaru motor, either, and we soon found out that two inexperienced Subaru guys was worth about jack squat. We forked around with that motor for an hour, and couldn't get the splines lined up. Several calls to experts offered up no obvious errors. It was well past 7 pm and we had both skipped lunch, so we called it a day. Paul joined Amy and I for dinner at the Purple Cow and we had a very filling and delicious meal.



The next day Calvin of COBB Tuning Plano stopped by and had it stabbed properly in no time at all. They hooked up the e-brake to help hold the drive wheels, and that was the trick. Color me shocked. Well, at least now we know. Calvin also heli-coiled the buggered-up, tapped knock sensor hole in the block that somebody back in October stripped on accident. So now everything can go back in place above that.

We still have some work to do before the car is finished enough to go to COBB for the custom wiring/tune and finish-up. All of the top end parts (intake, intercooler, etc) needs to be bolted on, and the power steering lines need to be hooked up before the motor is bolted to the subframe. Tie rods, clutch hydraulics, shifter installed, then things like the hood, the new headlight and taillight assemblies (and associated old-to-new car wiring splice work), brake system hooked up and bled, and fuel added to the car. Nothing we cannot handle in a couple of nights work. Let's just hope its not 10 weeks of waiting for the next work night! Since March is a crazy busy with 5 events already on that months' race schedule, we're trying to cram in as much work on the Subaru (and McCall's Z3M, and our E30, and our Mustang) in the next couple of weeks as possible. And if we're lucky Paul and McCall can get their cars running enough to make some races this year!



Meanwhile, in case the Subaru project gets bogged down further, Paul has his brand new 2011 Mustang GT to play with at track events. He bought it in January and loves it - this car is his new daily driver (the '08 STi is, sadly, gone bye-bye). The GT has the optional 14" Brembo brake package and we're going to install some Eibach springs and Vorshlag plates on it this week, and he can then have fun with it in NASA Time Trial TTB class for a bit. The Subaru's 18x10" Enkei's bolt up to the '11 GT (we're testing them here this week on the Vorshlag '11 GT), so that set of wheels could do double duty on both cars. Once the Subaru is running the GT will likely just go back to just DD status, but at least its a running, fast, reliable car he can take on track with little effort for the short term. Even the stock brake pads are solid, so all he really needs for it is a real set of tires and more negative camber, to keep the tires from eating themselves.

Until next time...

Last edited by Fair!; 02-15-2011 at 09:04 PM.
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Unread 04-04-2011, 12:20 PM
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Default Re: Paul Magyar's 1995 Subaru Impreza L - Street Mod/Track build

Project Update for April 2, 2011: I had this past Saturday open - well, after stopping by the Dallas Cars & Coffee show (pictures here) and then looking at a new trailer across town, so I scheduled half the day to work on Paul's Subaru. It had been 6 weeks since my last chance to stop by and help out on the Subaru project, but Paul had knocked out a number of things in that time. I'll touch on those updates then get to the work we did the rest of this Saturday.



The picture at left is the Enkei PF-01 we ordered for our Mustang. It is an 18x10.5" ET38 (7.2" B.S.) with a Hoosier 285/30/18 mounted for testing. Paul borrowed this a week ago and slapped it on the front of the Subaru... it fit perfectly without a spacer. Turns lock to lock with plenty of room. Sticks out about 1 inch, but the flare will more than cover that. Too bad it weighs 22 lbs. Still, its worth a look if he wants to use a wider 295 or 315mm autocross tire. Paul just picked up a 315/30/18 Hoosier yesterday to test with on the Mustang, so we'll see it on this wheel soon. At right is some Bondo work. Another friend of Paul's is a body man and had stopped by to help smooth out one of the rear fender flares. The LR flare is almost done, just needs a little more mud and smoothing.



Paul also got the start of the remote oil cooler lines installed underneath the motor, as well as the line built for the Accusump, which is routed through the firewall.



We installed the Whiteline tie rods and got the toe "eye-balled" enough so the car could be rolled around before going to COBB for an alignment. Then we burned about an hour or so getting the shifter installed. Paul had located almost everything we lacked before to install this, and after dropping the trans down to gain more access to start the poly shifter alignment guide at the back, it was all buttoned up. Then the various transmission crossmembers were bolted back up (what a big mess of steel that requires).



With the shifter work underway below I worked top-side and removed the stock steering wheel and airbag from the steering column. I read the "how to" on the interwebs and managed not to screw up the "clock spring" mechanism so all of the OEM '07 steering wheel parts can be sold. Installing the Sparco race wheel and column adapter was easy; I brought proper screws that I used on another one of our Sparco wheel installs.



Once the shifter was in place we installed the knob and it felt fine. The 18x10.5" on front once again, just to show how much it protrudes. We put the COBB downpipe on, locked down the motor mounts, installed the new aftermarket transmission mount, and then got to the motor. The coolant crossover pipe was bolted on and then the intake manifold was mocked-up. There were several vacuum lines on the intake Paul wants to plug so that isn't staying on lone. He also has some fuel line parts to procure before the fuel system is finished.



Last we installed the radiator, now that Paul had rounded up the factory OEM lower isolators. The STi versions were too large for the GC holes in the radiator surround, so they were opened up and then slide into place. We need to make some upper brackets, but he has to locate the correct radiator hoses first. Finally I cleaned off the white board and we made one big list of items to buy (click thumbnail above for large version) as well as the final work to be performed before it goes into COBB for a custom tune. The list is as big as ever but its also more detailed than before.

Paul has already purchased almost everything on this list and its in transit so we should have more progress soon.

Last edited by Fair!; 04-04-2011 at 12:55 PM.
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Unread 04-11-2011, 03:10 PM
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Default Re: Paul Magyar's 1995 Subaru Impreza L - Street Mod/Track build

Project Update April 11, 2011: Not much to add here, although Paul has been rounding up parts for the past week. Fuel system parts were one of the big purchases yet to be made, plus a lot of little stuff. Just for kicks I mounted the throw-away 315/30/18 Hoosier A6 to my 18x10.5" ET38 mentioned in the previous update. Haven't had a chance to add it to Paul's car yet but here it is mounted and weighed.



That's a lot of tire! 11" of tread on the ground.

Like I said we'll put this on the Subaru (and the '11 Mustang) soon and shoot some more pics.

Cheers,
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Unread 05-10-2011, 05:17 PM
Pete07 Pete07 is offline
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Default Re: Paul Magyar's 1995 Subaru Impreza L - Street Mod/Track build

Terry you need to go to Paul's house and get his coil overs installed I want to see how your going to mount the reservoirs. I just got a set of the 4200RR with your new high caster plates that I need to install. The car looks really nice can't wait to see it when its done.

-Peter
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Unread 05-10-2011, 08:51 PM
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Default Re: Paul Magyar's 1995 Subaru Impreza L - Street Mod/Track build

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Terry you need to go to Paul's house and get his coil overs installed I want to see how your going to mount the reservoirs. I just got a set of the 4200RR with your new high caster plates that I need to install. The car looks really nice can't wait to see it when its done.

-Peter
Agreed. I've spent 3 days in the past couple of weeks working on McCall's Z3 LS1 so I need to give some time to Paul on his Impreza, as these two are locked in a battle of "who can finish their project first".

Paul did locate some nice 2-piece 2" diameter grommets for the holes in the chassis needed to pass the entire reservoirs through. We also have some brackets to test that will be used to mount the reservoirs inside the trunk and under the hood, also.

More soon!
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Unread 05-11-2011, 01:35 PM
Pete07 Pete07 is offline
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Default Re: Paul Magyar's 1995 Subaru Impreza L - Street Mod/Track build

Yeah thats what were trying to figure out right now where to put the remotes since the hoses are so short. Were working on figuring it right now i will keep you posted on what we end up doing.

-Peter
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Unread 05-18-2011, 04:02 PM
CJ68 CJ68 is offline
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Default Re: Paul Magyar's 1995 Subaru Impreza L - Street Mod/Track build

I learned about his build over on the Subaru forum rs25.com. I have been trying to figure out what metal flares would work on a GC other than 80's Camry flares. This looks great so far. I can't wait to see what the front flares look like then see the whole package when it is done. I am the early stages of planning out my '01 RS GC/ '04 STI swap so I am absorbing all the info I can to make my build go as smooth as possible.

This is also the first thread that someone actually explains what I was going to do and remove the springs from the shocks and check full compression clearances. Props to you guys for a thorough and meticulous build.

I have a couple questions as well if you don't mind. When installing the GD dash I have seen one project where they did some extensive massaging of the fire wall to get the dash further forward because they didn't like the gaps on the sides of the dash where it meets the A pillar. Thoughts? What did you guys see as you fitted this up? In this other project they also sectioned the firewall where the steering column mounted. There was no mention in this thread about fitment issues so I am curious.

Because I was considering it as an option as well, what made you decide on the FP 68hta? I was dead set on picking up that turbo to replace my blown OEM unit but I was pretty much convinced by a few people to not bother and go bigger with something like a 20G. Do you want early spool above all else because of the autox duty this car will do? I have been leaning toward fabbing up my own plumbing to wedge a standard Garret GT3076r under the hood rather than go the stock location route but I am still eager to see what your setup does on the dyno after tuning. I could be swayed back to my original ideas.

Can't wait for the next update.
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Unread 05-18-2011, 04:08 PM
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Default Re: Paul Magyar's 1995 Subaru Impreza L - Street Mod/Track build

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Originally Posted by CJ68 View Post
I have a couple questions as well if you don't mind. When installing the GD dash I have seen one project where they did some extensive massaging of the fire wall to get the dash further forward because they didn't like the gaps on the sides of the dash where it meets the A pillar. Thoughts? What did you guys see as you fitted this up? In this other project they also sectioned the firewall where the steering column mounted. There was no mention in this thread about fitment issues so I am curious.
No, the firewall was completely left alone. We just made some small brackets to mount the front edge of the dash panel to the firewall. Having the windshield out made this possible - its inaccessible otherwise. The sides lined up pretty well, too. We re-drilled one hole on the dashbar to side mount. Not a big deal.

Paul has been wrenching on the car all last week and weekend. I'll try to head over there one night this week and take some pics of the progress.

More soon!
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