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Unread 11-17-2016, 03:01 PM
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Default Re: Vorshlag BRZ/FRS Project Development Thread

Project update for November 17th, 2016: It has only been a few months since my last update in our FR-S/BRZ development thread, but we've done some upgrades and development work on our red FR-S (which now has a name), Amy has run it at an autocross and driven it at a Track Night in America event.


Left: Amy has autocrossed the FR-S and tracked it. Right: Lap times from our Nov 10th track test (camber plates + brakes) were much faster!

We have installed some prototype suspension parts and a new Powerbrake big brake kit up front. After that we aligned the car then I track tested it at MSR-C to see how much quicker it is from our original stock baseline (a good bit, actually), all while still running the stock springs/swaybars/struts/tires. I am kind of surprised at how ... excited I am to see this car developed, because it is the "anti-Fair" car - a light, under-powered momentum car with skinny tires.

IMPRESSIONS AFTER 2 MONTHS OF OWNERSHIP

I shot this 6 minute in-car "Test drive" video a few weeks ago after owning this 2013 FR-S for almost exactly 2 months. In that time Amy has daily driven this car a lot and loves it, and even I have been warming up to it a bit. It was lighter than almost any RWD Coupe made in quite a while, and having a light yet rigid chassis matters SO MUCH.


Click here for 6 minute "test drive" video

If you watch the video above I talk for several minutes about the FR-S/BRZ chassis, explain why I think "car people" should test drive one. I compare the 86 chassis to the NC Miata (same time period, similar costs, similar weight) but explain the reasons why the 86 is a better track car than the MX5. I include some data - weights, front-to-rear bias, sales numbers - in the closed caption comments as well.

In the closing 30 seconds of the video above I give away a lot of the plans we have in store for this car, and a season of racing NASA TTD or TTC racing is probably not going to happen. If we stick to the plan we're going straight from stock engine to LS3, from 215 to 315mm tires. Because... America!



The same day as the 0-60mph test drive video, I spent about an hour washing and detailing the FR-S, which was the first time I think that I have cleaned this car up. It needed it, and still needs more detailing, but we have a lot of things we will change on the body before we really worry about paint detailing.



Stay tuned here for more development on this red FR-S. There is also a forum build thread detailing our Vorshlag Scion FR-S LSx Alpha Project, that I wrapped up recently after we finished work on this customer V8 car. That will be a way to show the various parts and systems we need to tie-into and develop using this car. Somehow I will merge that Alpha thread with the updates in this generic BRZ/FR-S development thread, after this red FR-S has a V8. Who knows, I might just post the same update in both threads? We'll see.



Anyway, it was nice to spend a little time cleaning up this car and doing a little 0-60 mph test, to help get this project kicked off properly. If we are going to go crazy on this car, it does need a name...

NAMING CARS IS SILLY - BUT OFTEN NECESSARY?

I know a bunch of you reading this will roll your eyes when you see that we have named the red FR-S. I am doing the same thing here, but let me explain. So many times in the past when I would see famous car builders naming their project cars I would groan. How starved for attention do you have to be to "name" a car you are building, thinking it is somehow special enough and rare enough to deserve that?


The world's first BMW E36 LS1 Swap build - our original "Alpha car".

But over the 12 years that I have been building up Vorshlag we have had to concede that, yes, sometimes you need to name your build. At first I would inadvertently call a build an "Alpha" or "Beta", just to show that it was the first or second of a type of V8 swap on a chassis. Like our "E36 Alpha LS1" (see above) was the first BMW ever built with an LS1 V8, way back in 2002, and was known for many years as "The Alpha" in BMW circles.


Left: Our NASA TTC build on a 1992 Corvette was "Project Dangerzone". Right: My beater shop truck is "Truck Norris"

After seeing our first "million view" thread after building that car, my wife pointed out that we need to keep naming our cars, even when I fought it. She is the one who came up with most of the names of subsequent shop car builds, and its always tricky to do without sounding silly. We've had some memorable ones such as: Jack Daniels, Dangerzone, Truck Norris, the GRM E30, and "The Red Car", to name a few.


Chainsaw (L) and Chainsaw Mouse (R) are being replaced by Chainsaw Massacre, a monster E46 M3 V8 build for a customer

Sometimes naming a car is a quick shorthand way for us to refer to one of many cars in our shop during the build period, or to quickly describe one of many cars from the same customer. We've built multiple cars for some customers, and one of them started naming each of his cars, which helped us when we conversed with him about multiple on-going projects: Chainsaw, Chainsaw Mouse, Chainsaw Massacre are three of his we built in a row. Even our own shop owned vehicles have become too numerous to describe quickly: We own FIVE different E46 BMWs right now, so a quick name is easier to use than "The white 330 Coupe... no, the other one!" We called our red TT3 Mustang GT "The Red Car" but we have 4 different "red cars" right now, so we have had to expand on that. And maybe Amy thought of a good one this time...



There was a spy comedy show called Get Smart, released before I was born, that ran for 5 years, and had several follow up movies as recently as 2008. The original show was created by Mel Brooks and the main star was Don Adams, who played Maxwell Smart, Agent 86. Most of you reading this know that the FR-S/BRZ/GT86 models are referred to as the 86 chassis globally. And that is where she came up with the name for the FR-S, Agent 86, and just "Max" for short. We're going to have to find a place to mount the shoe phone...?



So yea, this FR-S is called Agent 86, another car with a corny name. We don't name every project we build but only the ones we feel are worth it. Hopefully this build will live up to the hype.

TRACK NIGHT at MSR-C, SEPTEMBER 27, 2016

We brought the FR-S out to this SCCA "Track Night In America" event, where Amy got three track sessions. I barely paid any attention to the FR-S that night as I was performing three separate track tests in the Focus RS we are using for suspension, wheel and other development work so I was busy. We were swapping wheels/tires, changing settings, and had all manner of cameras, data loggers, and timers to keep up with in the RS.



This new AWD 300 hp Focus RS is a bit of an understeering mess and required some pretty drastic suspension changes before we got the car to "calm down" on track and quit eating front tires. We have done several tests at MSR with this car, even back when it was bone stock (where it ran a 1:27.4 in July). With the coilovers & camber plates it dropped to a 1:26.212 on the standard 235mm MPSS street tires, which was the 1st of 3 tests we did that night.



It dropped another HUGE chunk of time on the 275mm RE71R Bridgestones, shown above, running a best lap of 1:23.510 that night (which is only 1 second back from what I ran in a Corvette C6 Z06). So from stock to "better suspension + better street tires" we found 4 seconds in the Focus, which is a massive drop in lap time. Yet we have found more than half that much time drop in our FR-S just with camber plates and brakes. Check out the latest track test in this update, below.



This night wasn't about testing in the FR-S, as nothing had changed since we put it back to "refreshed stock form", so I didn't take any laps in it. Amy had three trouble-free sessions in the FR-S, but the front tires were starting to show some noticeable outer shoulder wear. Up to this point we have done ALL of our track testing on the same CCW 1.7 MSR course, so the right side tires are taking a beating, but especially the right front. The tread blocks were starting to chunk on that corner, just like we saw on the Focus RS. She ran some low 1:33 laps and had a blast, getting much needed seat time in the Scion.

AUTOCROSS WITH SCCA at LSP, October 23, 2016

Amy ran "Agent 86" in bone stock form at this autocross, her first in the red Scion. She ran in the local Women's class with a C Street PAX and had fun on the same CHEAP 320 treadwear 215mm tires. I was working at the shop that day, but she wanted to get one autocross event under her belt while it was still stock, to see the difference before and after. The more testing we can do along the path of mods we have planned, the better.



These cars in stock form are "fun" to drive, but they are not exactly fast. The tires they come with from the factory are a HUGE limitation, and the soft spring rates don't exactly make for flat cornering. Amy has a lot of experience autocrossing and has multiple SCCA National Championships under her belt, so her overall ranking in PAX will be a good metric for how fast and the car is at the moment - or not.



This was a typical course for our SCCA region, and she said she had a lot of fun slinging the car around. C Street class allows the dampers, swaybars and tires to be changed (any 200+ treadwear tires on the stock sized wheels).



Since this FR-S was still on the stock dampers, swaybars and tires, it would be handicapped pretty hard, but it is just where the car happens to be right now. The images above (which were purchased from two different photographers) show the score: lots of body roll, positive camber on the outside front tires. Damn this car needs some camber and spring rate, in a bad way!


Click here for the in-car video from Amy's best autocross run in stock form

Her runs on video all looked pretty spot-on to me, and she said it was easy to push the car to the limits, but that "the tires were CRAP". She had clean runs all day and placed 3 out of 4 in the PAXed Women's class. Jen Maxcy was in a proper STX prepped BMW E36 328is in the same class and was 4.5 seconds head of her times, so the lack of tires and class prep definitely showed here.



Amy placed 68th out of 151 times in the overall PAX standings, so we have a long way to go before the car is setting FTD or Top PAX at autocrosses (3.6 seconds back from Top PAX time). We figured as much, and while SCCA autocross classing won't play a real part in this build, it is a good metric to look at for overall competitiveness.

PROTOTYPE CAMBER PLATE FOR USE WITH OEM SPRINGS

As promised in my August update we wanted to use this red FR-S for development of a new camber plate design that works with the OEM spring diameter. We were unsure of how to go about this design but started with a handful of existing parts and designed a few more to see if we could make something that fit the tight constraints of the 86 chassis as well as the OEM spring limitations.


Left: Existing GD/86 plate for coilovers. Right: prototype 86 camber plate matches factory stack-up height, for OEM spring use

Our existing Subaru GD / 86 camber plate design (above left) works great with coilover springs with inner diameters of 2.25", 60mm or 2.5". We've sold hundreds of sets for these two Subaru chassis over the years but the camber plate + upper perch design is tough to replicate in the same space as the "short envelope" that the factory Subaru top mount + OEM upper spring perch fit inside.



The trick that Subaru pulls on many of their strut top mounts is to move the mount above the top surface of the strut tower sheet metal, and then make the upper perch domed so that it sits higher as well. These two aspects gain them some added bump travel, but it makes it difficult to replicate in an aftermarket camber-adjustable top mount design.



The image above left shows the amount the factory strut top mount "pokes" above the strut tower. The image at right is the bare tower without a top mount or strut installed. The round opening is rather large, and the trick we used to match the stock bits was putting the spherical bearing holder above the main camber plate, which gains some travel and keeps the stack-up short. We did so knowing that we would lose some camber travel, and thought we might have to make a unique main plate that lost the positive caster offset in our original GD / 86 camber plate design.

continued below

Last edited by Fair!; 12-04-2016 at 06:06 PM.
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Default Re: Vorshlag BRZ/FRS Project Development Thread

continued from above


To minimize "stack-up height" of the camber plate and perch we used our "large diameter" radial bearing shown at far right

After we had the main plate and bearing holder parts selected, Jason designed a super short OEM style spring perch. This billet aluminum part uses our unique sealed radial bearing in the perch, like all of our designs, which isolate steering loads away from the spherical bearing. The spherical should only pivot axially, and never rotating (or it wears out VERY quickly). This "large bearing" design also isolates the spring forces from the spherical, making it last even longer. You can see the perch installed above, during mock-up testing on Agent 86. We liked what we saw and then moved forward with the installation on the factory strut with the stock spring and rubber spring isolator.




With the spring compressed the stock top mount and upper spring perch were removed and the prototype camber plate + perch were installed onto the strut. We arranged the new components to retain the exact length and compressed height of the stock spring/strut/top mount. This new strut assembly was then installed on each side.



This setup would still allow for the added fixed amount of positive caster that our original GD design does, as well as considerable camber adjustment range. How much? The alignment rack would tell us. We were also able to use an existing, proven set of spherical bearing holder components - that don't have to shrink in size (and strength) to get every millimeter of adjustment, like some of the designs we see on competing 86 OEM plates. I wasn't willing to lose the massive strength advantage we have on our other designs, yet we could not afford to raise or lower the ride height with this OEM spring style design.



The new setup was able to keep the same ride height yet add an additional 1.9 degrees of inboard camber adjustment and reached +5.6 to 5.7 of caster. The final alignment sheet is shown below.



The max camber setting was -2.9 up front, which was more than we had hoped for, which was great. Initially we set this car at -2.2 front camber and 0 toe for use with the stock tires and suspension, for street driving. We drove it like this for a week and it made not a peep of noise or have any weird driving feel, so we tweaked it to up to -2.5 front camber for our next track test. With lowering springs installed the measured camber settings would be even higher - more negative - as they always do when you lower ride height on a McPherson strut car.




Jason (engineer) and Ryan (CNC operator), shown above left, worked on this one together and took a lot of measurements. I wanted this design to be RIGHT with no noise, no raising or lowering of ride heights, and plenty of camber and caster. Donnie (above right) had these struts on and off the car several times for measurement, testing, alignment checks, post-test inspections, and more.



After we had this design installed and street tested for a coupe of weeks we planned a track test at Motorsport Ranch track with the 86 as well as our TTD E46 BMW and a customers S197 Mustang race car. At the same time we added these camber plates we also upgrade the brakes. Because why not??

POWERBRAKE FRONT BRAKE UPGRADE

If you have been reading my build threads lately you may have seen this brand of brake caliper and rotor on other cars we have been working with. Powerbrake products are Motorsports grade brake caliper and rotor kits designed and machined in-house in South Africa. Their rotor rings are cast in Italy and machined in-house as well. The quality is second to none, but due to currency advantages for the US Dollar this is one of those few times you can "get more than you pay for."



The first Powerbrake branded kit we installed was used on our BMW E46 330 (above) we built for NASA TTD competition early in the 2016 season. This kit uses their "large" 4 piston caliper and a reasonably sized rotor - which is designed to fit under most 17" diameter wheels.



We have used these brakes on the E46 330 now for 5 race weekends or track tests and many hundreds of street miles with excellent results. We even had a double-driver weekend where Jon and I both drove it in back-to-back sessions for 2 days and the brakes never had a single issue. ROCK SOLID brakes that feel truly amazing. The difference in braking feel and confidence over OEM brakes really is indescribable until you drive on true Motorsports level brakes.

Pad and rotor wear has been much lower than before with the OEM brakes and race pads, which means they are lasting much longer. We have extrapolated this over the long run, and it looks like the "cost-per-lap" of the Powerbrake setup will be lower than the OEM rotors & race pad expenses, and that's what many other users are seeing.


Powerbrake X-Line X4ES 4-piston 325x28mm FRONT race brake kit for Subaru BRZ & Scion FR-S

After using the big 4 piston front Powerbrake kit on the 330 I wanted to test out the Powerbrake solution for the front of the FR-S. Luckily they had just released an updated caliper design for 2016 called the PBX4, which uses two pads per caliper (unlike the 4 piston caliper on our 330, an older design that used 4 "padlets" per caliper). Above is the Powerbrake X-Line front brake kit for the Subaru BRZ & Scion FR-S. This features their new X4ES 4-piston caliper and 325mm x 28mm 2-piece rotors.


The massive 4-piston Powerbrake X4ES caliper (at left) is 5 lbs lighter than the iron factory 2-piston FR-S front caliper (at right)

The calipers are big beefy things made from of billet aluminum. This is more expensive than using a near-net-shape casting in aluminum, but it makes for a more rigid caliper - and this is what separates Motorsport calipers from even upgraded OEM aluminum calipers like "factory Brembos". This article by StopTech discusses "monoblock" vs 2-piece caliper designs like this, and their conclusions make sense.



There are dozens of other features inside the calipers that make them better for Motorsport use as well. A quick look shows the stainless steel wear blocks, the gas ported stainless pistons, integral bridge, and the variable piston diameters which go into the engineered caliper solutions they produce. Vorshlag is working directly with the U.S. and South African Powerbrake engineer teams to help develop, test, and market their solutions for a variety of Asian, German, and a growing list of domestics.



After the FR-S front brake kit arrived we took measurements, weighed everything, and mocked the kit up on our car for installation pictures.



Many of the popular "big brake kits" (BBK) upgrades sold today are made to be HUGE, with rotors that reach 355mm or even 385mm in diameter. Those rotor sizes force drivers into 18" or even 19" wheel sizes. I could talk for an hour about wheel & tire diameters, sidewall heights, spring rates of tires, unnecessary mass, and tire selections in differing wheel diameters... but long story short, a massively larger diameter rotor can often be a determent on lightweight cars being used with sub-19" wheel diameters.


The larger 2-piece Powerbrake 325x28mm rotors are only a hair heavier than stock

As you can see in the pictures above, the Powerbrake rotors are indeed bigger, but in this kit they are not huge (and fit within most 17" wheels). These rotors manage heat with a thicker rotor, better venting design, and a lighter aluminum hat with (radial) floating hardware. All of these design features help improve brake feel and heat dissipation. Weight is lowered over stock, which is always a bonus, and between the caliper and rotor the Powerbrake system lost about 4.5 pounds per side over the smaller stock bits.



Another major gain in braking stability and heat management are in the calipers. This "X4ES" caliper has a slightly larger pad surface area but a much larger chunk of billet aluminum makes up the caliper structure itself. This provides a more stable backbone to the caliper under extreme heat and clamping force, which allows for much less distortion and better feel.



The FR-S/BRZ is a light (2650-2750 pounds) chassis and comes with a 17" wheel, and due to fender limits most folks end up with a 17x9" wheel and 255mm tire as the most common "wide wheel" used on the 86 with stock fenders. So in this instance the 4 piston caliper and moderate rotor sizes fit the needs nicely.



Our car may or may not move to this popular 17x9" wheel setup, but our former blue 2013 BRZ test mule did definitely go with that size (in both D-Force and Enkei RPF1) on 2 different sets of aftermarket wheels. This is the wheel & tire what we recommend for most of our 86 customers, so we felt the Powerbrake kit made to fit inside a 17" wheel was worth testing on our latest FR-S.


You sharp-eyed readers might notice that this rotor is on the wrong side - this was put on just for mock-up

When Powerbrake sent us this demo kit for our studio pictures we test fit the kit to our car with green tape on all of the metal surfaces, to avoid scratching the calipers/rotors in case we didn't use it. But it looked so good, and with only a 5mm spacer we realized that we could use these with the factory wheels and tires, so we kept these for use on Agent 86.



We also test fit these brakes (rotor + caliper) inside several other wheels one day, including a factory Subaru BRZ wheel, shown above. Like the factory 17x7" FR-S wheel, the BRZ wheel also required a 5mm spacer to clear the large Powerbrake X4ES 4-piston billet caliper. The other aftermarket wheels we tested did not.



The popular 17x8" Rota wheel made for the 86 chassis was tested, and the common 17x9" fitments should fit as well or better - except for maybe the Enkei RPF1, which typically has terrible caliper and rotor clearance (they use a design trick to keep these wheels light, which gobbles up caliper room). We will test an Enkei on our car with the Powerbrakes soon and post that picture here.


We love the RPF1 in 17x9" for the 86 chassis, but this wheel is notorious for poor caliper clearance

After firming up the long term plans for this car, that included the big brakes, we purchased this kit for Agent 86. We felt that even with the big wheels and tires we are moving to that the car will always be light, and this Powerbrake kit should still fit our needs long term. Donnie had this front setup installed in about 45 minutes, with a brake bleed it was an hour of work. 100% bolt on job, no mysteries, and their instructions were excellent. Calipers come with temp strips in 2 ranges and rotors have 5 stripes of temp sensitive paint, to help you see brake temps. Legit.



I don't like talking prices in these threads because then it all gets too "salesy", but this X4ES front caliper and rotor setup is remarkably well priced. If you want to know more, you know where to ask. These fit the car great, looked amazing, but we just needed to make the stock wheels fit the caliper...

continued below

Last edited by Fair!; 01-25-2017 at 10:00 AM.
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Default Re: Vorshlag BRZ/FRS Project Development Thread

continued from above

ADDING 5MM SPACERS AND LONGER WHEEL STUDS

Like the BRZ wheel, the factory 17x7" FR-S wheel is very "flat" and the spoke design is not conducive to an easy big brake upgrade. We knew from our mock-ups that we needed a 5mm spacer to clear the larger caliper with the stock wheels, but most other wheels we tested needed nothing. We haven't planned on keeping the stock wheels for much longer but we did want to get at least one more track test in with the tiny 215mm tires and 17x7" wheels to show just how much lap time drop we could attribute to the camber and brake upgrade.



The factory wheel studs on the 86 chassis are pretty short, and like most OEM fitments don't allow for even a narrow 5mm spacer. What you are looking for is proper thread engagement on the lug nuts, and the rule is "one diameter worth of threads". That means that on our M12 studs we need 12mm of depth of thread engagement with the lug nuts, after installing the spacer.

We tested with the spacer installed above and and it looked like the studs would be to short. We counted the turns on a lug nut anyway, and it was 2 threads short, so it was time for longer wheel studs. This was something we covered earlier in this build thread, where we installed 65mm long wheel studs on the blue BRZ and an FR-S. But I'll show it in more detail here....



The hubs are a unit bearing design that bolts to the front uprights, so those were removed (see above left). I snapped a quick pic of the 65mm studs we offer and have tested on these cars, both Subarus and 86 chassis cars alike. We also keep these 5mm thick, dual pattern 4 & 5 lug wheel spacers on hand. Being this thin they don't need or can even have an extended hub ring.



Pushing out the stock studs from the hubs was easy with our 30 ton air-over-hydraulic press. Takes a few seconds for each one, with some spacer plates used to clear the raised bearing section of the hubs. You can see the OEM length next to our 65mm studs above, too.



Installing the longer wheel studs was easy, just had to use a "spacer" to clear the raised section of the hub again. This spacer ended up being a second-hand bolt, but it worked fine. The splined ends of the studs need to be pressed in with a press like this, and "pulling" the studs in with a lug nut and impact gun is kind of a janky work-around. It always trashes the face of the lug nut, and always seems to cause minor damage to the stud during the install.



With the studs installed in the front hubs (we didn't do the rears at this time, but documented that earlier in this thread) we then looked at the factory "closed" lug nuts. Those are usually a problem with long wheel studs because the added length can keep the lug nut from installing all the way. An open lug nut is preferred and the "extended seat" long reach M12 lug nuts we make for Subarus fit the bill. Bigger nuts are always useful...



With the longer studs and 5mm wheel spacer installed you can see that the stock wheel spokes clear the caliper by about .200", which is double the clearance of factory 19x9" Mustang wheels to the factory Brembos, so no worries. We're gonna track test all of this properly, don't worry...

MSR TRACK TEST, NOVEMBER 10, 2016



Right about the time we wrapped up the prototype camber plate and Powerbrake install on the FR-S we had 2 other cars undergoing similar development - and all 3 needed to be track tested. We loaded up our NASA TTD prepped BMW 330 in the trailer, Jon drove the FR-S, and Jamie Beck brought his ST2 Mustang race car out to a member day on a Thursday in November.



The weather was overcast but cool (58-72F while we were running) and I took 5 test sessions that day, driving all 3 cars at least once and riding with Jamie in another. While it does take time and money to do these tests, nothing helps prove an upgrade like lap times at the same track.



As with all MSR member days you have to wear full racing gear, head to toe, which keeps the squid factor down. We tend to go on Fridays but this time a Thursday test fit our schedules better, and we ended up having less traffic to work around, which was nice.



All 3 cars we brought this day happened to have Powerbrake upgraded brakes, with the FR-S and ST2 Mustang both having new/untested setups. The Mustang had a prototype 6-piston front and 4-piston rear setup using 350mm rotors, which fit this car's capabilities since it has 18x11" wheels and 315mm Hoosier R7s.



Jon and I each ran the E46 330 for a session and I put in one session in the FR-S, then 3 sessions testing and coaching in the Mustang. We ran the E46 back in March with NASA to a 1:27.604 best lap and this time I ran a 1:25.075 lap, for a 2.6 second drop in time. Even after dropping 250 pounds over the summer this BMW car is still 300 pounds heavier than the FR-S, but it does have a 245mm R7 tire on a 17x10" wheel, so it was making closer to 1.3g lateral grip.



The in-car video above shows the best lap on the FR-S, plus a little clip where I tried a "2 in the dirt" line on another lap. I tried to take a certain fast corner "full throttle" and couldn't quite make it work with this setup, heh. Only time I have touched dirt in all of our test sessions here since March, but I had to try it.



Back in our August 31st "baseline stock" lap testing I netted a best lap of 1:31.90 after 3 sessions of driving the stock FR-S. With the only changes being added camber and the Powerbrake front setup, I managed to drop 2.3 seconds netting a best lap of 1:29.630 this time. That's still with total CRAP tires that cost $50 each. That picture of the FR-S (above left) is after I passed the gutted E46 M3 race car on Conti slicks. Gotta admit, that felt good, but he was still warming up his tires. But still.



Here's a listing of cars and lap times we have run at MSR on this same 1.7 mile CCW configuration:
I will usually say that laps here under 1:30 are respectable for street cars, running under 1:25 is pretty fast, and under 1:20 is hauling ass. So the FR-S at a 1:29.630 is at least getting "respectable" now. Technically this would be classed as a NASA TTD car, so we're not exactly breaking any track records here yet, but we have barely started to prep the car. These tires are REALLY holding us back on lap times, yet still make 1.10g lateral grip. Not bad for fiddy bucks.



We show the tire wear at the end of the track video, but these "new in August" tires had already taken a beating at the August and September track days without any camber up front - both "outside" tires (right side) showed plenty of wear. These tires were swapped front to rear before this event, and the front tire wear was was noticeably lower after getting -2.5 camber dialed in. Not surprising, right? Yet I was shocked at how much time we dropped with just "brakes and camber". A 2.3 second change is a big drop. Just encourages us to keep going and see how quick we can get this thing!

WHAT'S NEXT?

We still have an aggressive development plan for this car and I will show what we've done over the winter when we have some mods worth showing. The prototype OEM-style camber plate solution tested on our FR-S has already been released and we have production components for this 86 chassis. The 4-piston Powerbrake kit is also available.


Do we go back to a tried-and-true MCS TT1 and 17x9" wheel setup just for lap time testing on our red FR-S?

We're torn on what wheel/tire package to go with on Agent 86 next, and have debated this internally at great length. We know the 17x9" wheel / 255mm tire is good for an easy 3 second drop but do we pause there, or jump ahead to the BIG wheel and tire package we want to use with V8 power? Same goes for the coilover shock decisions - do we test a Bilstein PSS10 or MCS TT1 first, or jump to the MCS RR2 setup? Choices, choices...


Track testing this current BRZ coilover + 17x9" setup will give us the data to fill in the gaps...

To test that "next step" on track we are going to borrow Chase Reeves BRZ, which I mentioned last time. We used his car for PSS10 / Hyperco coilovers / Vorshlag camber plate / Vorshlag RSM testing and he loves the setup. He also has the 9" wide wheels and stickier tires on it, which we will try to take to MSR soon and get laps on. Will be a good metric of what to expect when you step up the mod ladder.

More soon,
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Default Re: Vorshlag BRZ/FRS Project Development Thread

do you guys sell Power Brake? You've put it on a few of your cars but I can't find it on your website... or any website for that matter
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  #15  
Unread 01-06-2017, 05:51 PM
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Fair! Fair! is offline
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Default Re: Vorshlag BRZ/FRS Project Development Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by warmmilk View Post
do you guys sell Power Brake? You've put it on a few of your cars but I can't find it on your website... or any website for that matter
Yes, we are a dealer. Its a long story but Powerbrake is just now getting the application catalog out to dealers with pricing and car coverage. We here at Vorshlag are about to launch our brand new website in the next few days and will have listings there.


Powerbrake X-Line X4ES 4-piston 325x28mm FRONT race brake kit for Subaru BRZ & Scion FR-S

The X4ES front big brake kit for this FR-S/BRZ is $1995 for the rotors, calipers, brackets, lines and hardware. Pads can come from Powerbrake (+$275, in a number of compounds) or virtually any other supplier - they use common ISI pad shapes so you have over a dozen pad choices.

Thanks,

Last edited by Fair!; 01-06-2017 at 06:00 PM.
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  #16  
Unread 01-09-2017, 08:27 PM
warmmilk warmmilk is offline
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Default Re: Vorshlag BRZ/FRS Project Development Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fair! View Post
Yes, we are a dealer. Its a long story but Powerbrake is just now getting the application catalog out to dealers with pricing and car coverage. We here at Vorshlag are about to launch our brand new website in the next few days and will have listings there.

[IMG]https://photos.smugmug.com/Product-Pictures/Powerbrake/i-pHcNBJM/0/M/B61G0177_3-M.jpg[IMG]
Powerbrake X-Line X4ES 4-piston 325x28mm FRONT race brake kit for Subaru BRZ & Scion FR-S

The X4ES front big brake kit for this FR-S/BRZ is $1995 for the rotors, calipers, brackets, lines and hardware. Pads can come from Powerbrake (+$275, in a number of compounds) or virtually any other supplier - they use common ISI pad shapes so you have over a dozen pad choices.

Thanks,
do they have a kit for the NC Miata?
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